Scott Crawford lifted the award in a competition run by the Scottish Design Exchange in recognition of his ‘outstanding’ and ‘highly original’ work. The 

Scott Crawford lifted the award in a competition run by the Scottish Design Exchange in recognition of his ‘outstanding’ and ‘highly original’ work.

The 24-year-old – who graduated from Greys Art School, Aberdeen last year after studying ceramics – beat dozens of other young artists and craftspeople to clinch the title.

Judges praised how he uses the physical world around him to generate ideas for his work, which has a Scottish and Scandanavian influence.

Scott produces a range of bespoke, self-designed products at a workshop in the east end of Glasgow.

He also has a second job, as a retail sales assistant, until he can afford to become a full-time professional designer.

As winner of the award, Scott will receive £1000 prize money as well as free sales space on the SDX website and in its stores in Edinburgh and Glasgow.

“There are so many fantastic young designers in Scotland and to win this award is like a dream come true,” said Scott, who grew up in Caprington and went to Kilmarnock Academy

“I know how tough the competition will have been and I can’t thank the judges and the SDX enough for giving me this honour.”

Scott plans to use the money to invest in marketing his products to a wider audience.

Competition judge Mike Stevenson, who is SDX chairman, said: “Scott strikes me as a highly intelligent young designer. I loved his vision of pushing Scottish design into the future.

“His products really are beautiful, original and when you learn they are inspired by Scottish coastal architecture it makes you realise that he is a young man in touch with his environment and with a strong, purposeful approach to design.

“I can see his products becoming must haves in many Scottish homes.”

SDX is a not-for-profit social enterprise which has given retail space to over 300 artists, helping them to turn over more than £1.1 million in revenue, since it was launched in 2015.

Chief executive Lynzi Leroy said: “Scott is not unusual. We hear the same thing from a lot of young artists.

“Even those who do have some business acumen find that the cost of marketing and retail space is prohibitively expensive.

“Scotland has a wealth of emerging creative talent and we should be giving these young artists and designers all the help we can.

“Instead, it seems, we’re placing obstacles in their way and so it’s no surprise that many of them become disillusioned or find that they simply can’t afford to become fully professional.”

Daily record